NBAA addresses business aviation's workforce shortage

NBAA, the National Business Aviation Association posted an article addressing the workforce shortage in business aviation. The article identifies issues and suggests solutions, which align with solutions being implemented by Pathways to Aviation.

As a courtesy to NBAA and without disturbing the quality of the article, we'll share various excerpts and provide links to the full article. It's a great read.

The article can be found on its website, www.NBAA.org (click here).

Business aviation is finding it increasingly difficult to attract and retain talent, in part because the airlines are offering what is perceived to be a better deal, and in part because of an overall decline in the number of people choosing aviation careers.

WHY ARE PEOPLE LEAVING BUSINESS AVIATION?
NBAA’s Business Aviation Management Committee recently conducted a pilot workforce retention study, which involved interviewing former business aircraft pilots who have departed the industry for the airlines. The goal of the study was to better understand why these aviators are leaving business aviation.

CHALLENGING THE PERCEPTIONS
Are these perceived advantages of the airlines and other industries – higher compensation, better quality of life and job stability – valid? And will these perceived benefits last? While U.S. airlines are hiring now, history shows that in economic downturns, carriers often furlough thousands of pilots.

COUNTERING THE TRENDS
Business aircraft operators can establish a mentorship or internship program by partnering with area aviation colleges, technical schools and universities. They also can host outreach days, inviting elementary, middle school and high school students and community groups to visit the hangar and observe daily operations.

LOWER MINIMUMS AND EMPHASIZING EMPLOYEE VALUE
Another strategy to increasing the ranks of business aviation pilots is to consider lowering minimum hourly requirements for high-quality new hires, but providing these recruits with enhanced training within the company’s safety culture.

FEASIBILITY OF THE STRATEGIES
Developing internship and mentoring programs, educating key decision-makers and making sure your personnel know they are valued are internal processes that require effort and commitment from business aviation managers and their parent organizations.

Regardless of which strategies business aircraft operators employ to attract and retain qualified personnel, it’s clear that the industry, as a whole, needs to make a concerted effort to ensure that there will be enough talent, both today and tomorrow.

“All business aviation professionals need to be part of the solution...We can’t wait for someone else to do it.”

Contact Pathways to Aviation to learn how its Futures in Aerospace initiative is providing solutions to bridge the workforce shortage gap.

 

 

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